Dr. Kalougivaki Presents Papers on Forensic Issues of Human Migration

Dr James Kalougivaki (1st back row) with executive committee of APMLA and executives of ICRC. Photo: POLICE MEDIA CELL.

The Fiji Police Force’s Forensic Pathologist Dr James Kalougivaki recently presented two papers at the Asia-Pacific Medico-legal Agency (APMLA) meet and ICRC workshop training on the Forensic Issues of human migration.

The meet was held in Thailand on the 17th of July and in attendance were more the 300 participants from more than 17 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Dr Kalougivaki presented two papers on; training for first responder in Disaster Victim Management and the creation & establishment of the Pacific Forensic Network.

“I have been an executive committee member of APMLA for the past two years and the Fiji Police Force is an institutional member”.

“The FPF Forensic Pathology Unit under the Forensic Science Service is well connected to Forensic Institutions of more than 18 countries through the APMLA”.

The Asia Pacific Medico- Legal Agencies (APMLA) network has 20 forensic medical member institutions from 18 Asian and Pacific nations

Dr Kalougivaki said one of the emerging issues discussed extensively during the meet include forensic Issues of human migration.

“Human migration poses a great challenge when there are many deaths, as it impacts drastically on the victim identification of the deceased”.

The APMLA has an important role as a central body for strengthening forensic medical capacities, standardizing the process of victim identification and encouraging the adoption of standards to better prepare nations for mass casualty situations.

The Fiji Police Force’s Forensic Pathologist Dr James Kalougivaki recently presented two papers at the Asia-Pacific Medico-legal Agency (APMLA) meet and ICRC workshop training on the Forensic Issues of human migration.

The meet was held in Thailand on the 17th of July and in attendance were more the 300 participants from more than 17 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Dr Kalougivaki presented two papers on; training for first responder in Disaster Victim Management and the creation & establishment of the Pacific Forensic Network.

“I have been an executive committee member of APMLA for the past two years and the Fiji Police Force is an institutional member”.

“The FPF Forensic Pathology Unit under the Forensic Science Service is well connected to Forensic Institutions of more than 18 countries through the APMLA”.

The Asia Pacific Medico- Legal Agencies (APMLA) network has 20 forensic medical member institutions from 18 Asian and Pacific nations

Dr Kalougivaki said one of the emerging issues discussed extensively during the meet include forensic Issues of human migration.

“Human migration poses a great challenge when there are many deaths, as it impacts drastically on the victim identification of the deceased”.

The APMLA has an important role as a central body for strengthening forensic medical capacities, standardizing the process of victim identification and encouraging the adoption of standards to better prepare nations for mass casualty situations.

POLICE MEDIA CELL